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Old 01-23-2019, 05:39 PM
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Member Since: Nov 2016
Location: UK
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Default Re: Do you relate to this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdDancer View Post
I sort of lean towards wildflowerchild's response, but as Guinness suggests, a psychiatrist is the best person to confirm any diagnosis, or lack thereof.

People can lack insight to hypomania, and even mania. However, the DSM-5, in the US, clearly states that even hypomania is generally noticable to others and clearly reflects a difference from a person's stable state. Hypomanic symptoms are also ones that others can usually identify as "Yea, so-and-so does talk fast" or "Yea, they can act a little wild, or strange, or over-the-top on occasion or seem to do a lot more than most people sometimes." Of course there are people without bipolar that are loud Chatty Cathys and/or high energy wild childs, but they may not exhibit any major changes to that state under normal circumstances.

Have you ever heard of the Bipolar Spectrum? Some experts have a very broad definition of it, while others don't. Some that do may even consider a person whose moods frequently fluctuate between mild to moderate depression and stable baseline as on the spectrum. Such a person may not necessarily qualify for even a bipolar 2 or Cyclothymia diagnosis, but may still benefit from bipolar moodstabilizers more than antidepressants.

I don't know if you are female or male, but in some cases hormonal issues could be in play. Or something totally different unrelated to mental illness. I only mention this because these issues and questions are the reasons why diagnosis by a psychiatrist is recommended.
I don't know if this counts, but when I was at high school my symptoms used to be far more severe and I couldn't mask it in front of others as well. During my more productive phases my classmates used to ask me if I'm drugs and if I'm doing cocaine. I've mastered my pretending ever since and I try really hard to seem balanced so now people rarely notice anything unless I want them to notice it. The reaction of my classmates at high school was an extreme source of shame for me, and I'd rather die than experience it ever again. I'm extremely fearful about how other people see me.
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