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Old 07-04-2018, 02:14 PM #1
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Default Psychotherapy for ADHD? (Alternatives to meds?)

Has anyone used psychotherapy to treat their ADHD? Has it helped at all? What kind of psychotherapy was used on you? Thanks!
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Old 07-26-2018, 08:29 AM #2
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Default Re: Psychotherapy for ADHD? (Alternatives to meds?)

My understanding of what would be utilized with a therapist in addressing ADHD are life skills types of approaches with things such as time management, organization, ways to manage emotions and stress.
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Old 08-01-2018, 06:12 PM #3
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Default Re: Psychotherapy for ADHD? (Alternatives to meds?)

Hello there,

My son did psychotherapy many years ago when he was in middle school. It helped him with coping skills, time management, deal with emotions and organizational skills. He is an adult now and does really well. However he will not drive. Hes afraid of getting distracted. My son takes the bus to work. He does not mind riding it.
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Old 09-30-2018, 10:07 AM #4
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Default Re: Psychotherapy for ADHD? (Alternatives to meds?)

ADHD is physiological due to under-developed prefrontal cortex. Medication is like glasses for near/farsightedness. If you have concern about medication, you should know that the warnings and dangers are for a nuerotypical brain. The majority of primary care are about 15 years behind the experts on this, and the experts have found no negative consequences to long-term or high doses of stimulants in atypical ADHD brains. Look into the work of Dr. Russell Barkley. You can find his lectures on youtube.

As for other treatments, ADHD is supported by good diet, sleep and exercise just as any one's mind is, but you cannot health away ADHD. There are coping tools, but most require you to build habits and use external tools and feedback systems that work for a time and then become forgotten and discarded when the novelty wears off or something distracts you away from them. There is really no way to therapy ADHD away.

Building good habits and practices can help. Habits are tricky to form though because they rely on working memory and focus, which without medication, is very difficult to control and hence likely why you are asking the question you are.

Truthfully, nothing else compares to stimulants and how it helps an ADHDer. Look at it this way. Our brain is underdeveloped and has dopamine uptake issues. This causes the attention and focus issues, as well as all the related emotional and learning issues too. Stimulants boost the dopamine up to a normal level, which then allows the ADHDer's brain to focus as close as possible to a non-ADHD brain. Pretty much like how glasses work.

ADHDers don't experience the issues a neurotypical does either. My doctor once joked with me, if stimulants were so addictive for ADHDers, then why do all of my patients forget to take their meds constantly? I asked him if he was kidding, and he then said his ADHDers forget their meds and refilling their meds about half of the time on average.

Think about it. I will tell you this, I never have cravings or withdrawl symptoms nor do I experience any eurporhia. Medication just keeps me able to keep my emotions and thoughts from bouncing around while staying focused enough to get routine work done. It doesn't fix everything, but life is much more stable with the medication than without it.

Personally, I would do medication and coping tools. Both from top ADHD experts only.
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Old 10-18-2018, 09:39 PM #5
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Default Re: Psychotherapy for ADHD? (Alternatives to meds?)

all day i do nothing. some thing is seriously wrong with me... is it adhd?
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