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Old 06-04-2020, 06:44 PM   #1
jesyka
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Default Questions about ADD

Hi, I'm new here. I googled information about ADD but I'd like to know more about what it's like from people who have it. I'd also like to know what it's like to deal with people who have ADD and what your experiences been like.

I'm asking because a friend of mine told me that she has ADD, but I think that she's lying about it as it does seem that she CAN control her behaviour at times with effort.

Anyways, is it common for people with ADD to seem like they're not listening to you at all? Do they get distracted and do things like start talking about a different topic or running off constantly when they see something else that interests them? Example, my friend would just leave my side and look at dogs without saying anything when we went for walks and not excuse herself or say sorry.

She'd also obsess over FB on her phone and constantly check her texts and FB on the phone. She'd say, I got a text. She'd still check her texts which were non emergency texts and not apologize for things.

She stopped doing that after I told her numerous times how rude that is and to not call me if she can't focus on the conversation at the time. She did stop doing that, but it took her awhile to stop.

Also, she refuses to get a diagnosis or get on ADD meds. She told me that since her other friends and the people at work and her clients have no issue with the way that she is, then there is no need for her to get help as her issues with ADD are just "quirks'.

She told me that I was being intolerant and that I'm the only one who ever complained about her being rude, ugh! I'm sure that other people think that she's rude too, but they probably don't want o upset her as she can't seem to take any kind of criticism.

She actually started crying in public when I tried to kindly set boundaries with her. That's when she told me that she has "ADD' and 'OCD'/ after knowing her for over 3 years back in last year of November .

I call b.s as why wouldn't she tell me that sooner? She told me that I was placing 'restrictions' on her and that she doesn't believe in boundaries, but THEN she tried to set them with me right after that and that I should respect HER boundaries by not telling her about my personal problems anymore as she can't handle the "negativity".

Does anyone else think that sounds suspicious? She is definitely sneaky and indirect with how she likes to communicate and has even admitted that to me. I'd appreciate any insight and responses.

Also, I'm not trying to judge people who have ADD. I sympathize with them. With her though, she CAN control her behaviour. When someone really does have ADD, are they not able to control their behaviour without medication?

And does medication help with focus and behaviour?
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Old 06-13-2020, 04:20 AM   #2
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Default Re: Questions about ADD

Hey @jesyka
Quote:
Originally Posted by jesyka View Post
Hi, I'm new here. I googled information about ADD but I'd like to know more about what it's like from people who have it. I'd also like to know what it's like to deal with people who have ADD and what your experiences been like.

I'm asking because a friend of mine told me that she has ADD, but I think that she's lying about it as it does seem that she CAN control her behaviour at times with effort.
Quote:
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a mental disorder of the neurodevelopmental type.[11][12] It is characterized by difficulty paying attention, excessive activity, and acting without regards to consequences, which are otherwise not appropriate for a person's age.[1][2] Some individuals with ADHD also display difficulty regulating emotions or problems with executive function.[13][14][15][2] For a diagnosis, the symptoms should appear before a person is twelve years old, be present for more than six months, and cause problems in at least two settings (such as school, home, or recreational activities).[3][16] In children, problems paying attention may result in poor school performance.[1] Additionally there is an association with other mental disorders and substance misuse.[17] Although it causes impairment, particularly in modern society, many people with ADHD can have sustained attention for tasks they find interesting or rewarding (known as hyperfocus).?
Quote:
Do they get distracted and do things like start talking about a different topic or running off constantly when they see something else that interests them? Example, my friend would just leave my side and look at dogs without saying anything when we went for walks and not excuse herself or say sorry.

She'd also obsess over FB on her phone and constantly check her texts and FB on the phone. She'd say, I got a text. She'd still check her texts which were non emergency texts and not apologize for things.

She stopped doing that after I told her numerous times how rude that is and to not call me if she can't focus on the conversation at the time. She did stop doing that, but it took her awhile to stop.

Quote:
Inattention, hyperactivity (restlessness in adults), disruptive behavior, and impulsivity are common in ADHD.[53][54] Academic difficulties are frequent as are problems with relationships.[53] The symptoms can be difficult to define, as it is hard to draw a line at where normal levels of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity end and significant levels requiring interventions begin.[55]

According to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), symptoms must be present for six months or more to a degree that is much greater than others of the same age[2] and they must cause significant problems functioning in at least two settings (e.g., social, school/work, or home).[2] The criteria must have been met prior to age twelve in order to receive a diagnosis of ADHD.[2] This requires more than 5 symptoms of inattention or hyperactivity/impulsivity for those under 17 and more than 4 for those over 16 years old.
Quote:
She told me that I was being intolerant and that I'm the only one who ever complained about her being rude, ugh! I'm sure that other people think that she's rude too, but they probably don't want o upset her as she can't seem to take any kind of criticism.

She actually started crying in public when I tried to kindly set boundaries with her. That's when she told me that she has "ADD' and 'OCD'/ after knowing her for over 3 years back in last year of November .
Quote:
People with ADHD of all ages are more likely to have problems with social skills, such as social interaction and forming and maintaining friendships. This is true for all subtypes. About half of children and adolescents with ADHD experience social rejection by their peers compared to 1015% of non-ADHD children and adolescents. People with attention deficits are prone to having difficulty processing verbal and nonverbal language which can negatively affect social interaction. They also may drift off during conversations, miss social cues, and have trouble learning social skills.[
Difficulties managing anger are more common in children with ADHD[59] as are poor handwriting[60] and delays in speech, language and motor development.[61][62] Although it causes significant difficulty, many children with ADHD have an attention span equal to or better than that of other children for tasks and subjects they find interesting.[18]
Quote:
Does anyone else think that sounds suspicious? She is definitely sneaky and indirect with how she likes to communicate and has even admitted that to me. I'd appreciate any insight and responses.

Also, I'm not trying to judge people who have ADD. I sympathize with them. With her though, she CAN control her behaviour. When someone really does have ADD, are they not able to control their behaviour without medication?
Quote:
It is estimated that between 25% of adults have ADHD.[28] Around 2550% of children with ADHD continue to experience ADHD symptoms into adulthood, while the rest experiences fewer or no symptoms.[2][28] Currently, most adults remain untreated.[161] Many adults with ADHD without diagnosis and treatment have a disorganized life and some use non-prescribed drugs or alcohol as a coping mechanism.[32] Other problems may include relationship and job difficulties, and an increased risk of criminal activities.[28] Associated mental health problems include: depression, anxiety disorder, and learning disabilities.[32]

Some ADHD symptoms in adults differ from those seen in children. While children with ADHD may climb and run about excessively, adults may experience an inability to relax, or they talk excessively in social situations. Adults with ADHD may start relationships impulsively, display sensation-seeking behavior, and be short-tempered. Addictive behavior such as substance abuse and gambling are common. The DSM-V criteria do specifically deal with adults, unlike those in DSM-IV, which were criticized for not being appropriate for adults; those who presented differently may lead to the claim that they outgrew the diagnosis.[28]
Quote:
And does medication help with focus and behaviour?
Quote:
Stimulant medications are the pharmaceutical treatment of choice.[43][185] They have at least some effect on symptoms, in the short term, in about 80% of people.[46][42][185] Methylphenidate appears to improve symptoms as reported by teachers and parents.[42][46][186] Stimulants may also reduce the risk of unintentional injuries in children with ADHD.[187]

There are a number of non-stimulant medications, such as atomoxetine, bupropion, guanfacine, and clonidine that may be used as alternatives, or added to stimulant therapy.[43][188] There are no good studies comparing the various medications; however, they appear more or less equal with respect to side effects.[189] Stimulants appear to improve academic performance while atomoxetine does not.[190] Atomoxetine, due to its lack of addiction liability, may be preferred in those who are at risk of recreational or compulsive stimulant use.[28] There is little evidence on the effects of medication on social behaviors.[189] As of June 2015, the long-term effects of ADHD medication have yet to be fully determined.[191][192] Magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest that long-term treatment with amphetamine or methylphenidate decreases abnormalities in brain structure and function found in subjects with ADHD.[193][194][195] A 2018 review found the greatest short-term benefit with methylphenidate in children and amphetamines in adults.[196]
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Old 06-14-2020, 11:36 PM   #3
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Default Re: Questions about ADD

Hi, thanks for the detailed reply. I appreciate it.
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