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Old 08-30-2018, 04:15 PM   #11
hgpd
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Default Re: Difference between social anxiety and AvPD?

But you said there are medications that are improving it, right? AvPD doesn't work like that.
It's possible that you've had a condition for so long you don't remember life without it. That doesn't mean it can't improve.
I suspect you have fears of change and that you're grasping at straws to stay where you are. That's cool. But don't let it limit you. Tell your therapist what you've been thinking, that successful treatment is making you question your diagnosis. (Think about that one for a little bit.) Therapists are trained to help their clients through the feelings that come up when changes start happening.
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Old 08-30-2018, 08:57 PM   #12
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Default Re: Difference between social anxiety and AvPD?

Quote:
Originally Posted by marvin_pa View Post
I understand the distinction in your reply, but what if the SA has been present for long enough that to all intent & purpose, it is your 'yourself'? I mean, my tendency to avoid / stress over something that could be considered a typical SA trigger is likely omnipresent in me, but is also something that is often as much subconscious, as something that I'd actually think about. Like the dysthymia, I don't remember a time when it wasn't part of my thought processes, but it's likely such an integrated part of those processes that I wouldn't necessarily notice if it was on/off.

Hmm. Should apparently lifelong dysthymia be considered a personality disorder?
The word “Avoidance” is so easy to recognise and identity with.
I think confuses allot of people when really they are experiencing the effects of Depression.
Sadness will make you withdraw with all associated feelings of avoiding
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Diagnosed: AvPD.

It’s never alright. It comes and it goes.
It’s always around, even when it don’t show.
They say it gets better. well I guess that it might.
But even when it’s better, it’s never alright.
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Old 08-30-2018, 09:38 PM   #13
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Default Re: Difference between social anxiety and AvPD?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snap66 View Post
The word “Avoidance” is so easy to recognise and identity with.
I think confuses allot of people when really they are experiencing the effects of Depression.
Sadness will make you withdraw with all associated feelings of avoiding
I think that I realize that distinction, also... it's actually part of the reason that I began looking into AvPD & posted this in the 1st place. Avoidance coping is something that I'm very familiar with. Mine can be significantly worsened during (and to a degree, after) an MDD episode, but it is always present, even if I'm able to override it during times where I only deal with dysthymia.

Whilst I have been given effective treatments that have largely kept MDD episodes at bay & allow me to better handle SA, the avoidance aspect of my behavior seems to remain & if anything is now more exposed.
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Old 10-16-2018, 03:35 PM   #14
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Default Re: Difference between social anxiety and AvPD?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snap66 View Post
Everyone avoids, everyone withdraws when sad or depressed...
We don't have a patent on that so, yes, they both read simular but the differences is in the response and reaction.


A person with SA is basically in charge of their own thoughts and triggered into varying degrees of dire straights by certain events, circumstances etc.


AvPD is personality, we don't have thoughts that haven't been induced by AvPD. (every thought!)
The Avoidance has shaped us into how we think, act and behave.
Since early childhood we have been mentally groomed, following and learning not from our parents or caregivers, but AvPD because that is/was the only thing that is constant and dependant in our lives. (there is a bit more to that as well)

That shaping of maladjusted thinking becomes our psyche with reinforcement to keep a tight grip on us.
Think about it if something so terrible was easy to escape from then we wouldn't be influenced as we are.


AvPD is recognisable on here and that's why we are quick to pick up those who don't have the disorder. That early childhood and onward AvPD nurturing is obvious as its like a accent or signature in, like I said their response, and reactions.

SA and AvPD can be worded simular as they are both Anxiety issues, but one has ongoing impact even during times of quiet where the other needs a match to ignite.

Your psych will work with you and cater your needs accordingly.
I'm really sorry about the wall of text.
In the end, after a bunch of years, I finally understood the difference.
Thanks :-)
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Old 11-23-2018, 02:08 PM   #15
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Default Re: Difference between social anxiety and AvPD?

Quote:
Originally Posted by marvin_pa View Post
I understand the distinction in your reply, but what if the SA has been present for long enough that to all intent & purpose, it is your 'yourself'? I mean, my tendency to avoid / stress over something that could be considered a typical SA trigger is likely omnipresent in me, but is also something that is often as much subconscious, as something that I'd actually think about. Like the dysthymia, I don't remember a time when it wasn't part of my thought processes, but it's likely such an integrated part of those processes that I wouldn't necessarily notice if it was on/off.

Hmm. Should apparently lifelong dysthymia be considered a personality disorder?
I can relate to this
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Old 11-23-2018, 04:47 PM   #16
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Default Re: Difference between social anxiety and AvPD?

Hmm.. I haven’t been here much in this forum. Personally, I think that it would be easier to spot who has Avpd and who maybe doesn’t.. in a real life support group.. and of course Avpd isn’t the only dx that some people have...CPTSD for example.

I agree with whoever wrote that going for professional help for anxiety disorders is very hard and ... anxiety provoking. And if the atmosphere isn’t welcoming to some of those who are trying to learn about a disorder online...or if some feel the atmosphere isn’t welcoming.. it could be about them.... they may be even more reluctant to access professional help/support.

Especially if, as is not uncommon in this forest, (Not USA) they have been hurt by professionals before. The client/patient may be “too sensitive” - in the clinicians perception.. or the clinician may be insensitive.
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