Does meds actually help? - Forums at Psych Central



advertisement
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-14-2019, 01:55 PM #1
autumn4689's Avatar
autumn4689 autumn4689 is offline
Junior Member
 
Member Since: May 2019
Location: NC
Posts: 12
autumn4689 autumn4689 is offline
Junior Member
autumn4689's Avatar
autumn4689 has no updates.
 
Member Since: May 2019
Location: NC
Posts: 12

11 hugs
given
Question Does meds actually help?

Last night I fought with my SO because I created all these delusions in my head of him lying to me. Why do I keep creating all these fake scenarios in my head then start to believe them? Does medication help? If so, what kind?
autumn4689 is offline   Reply With QuoteReply With Quote

advertisement
Old 05-15-2019, 03:48 PM #2
HD7970GHZ's Avatar
HD7970GHZ HD7970GHZ is offline
Poohbah
 
Member Since: Sep 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,476
HD7970GHZ HD7970GHZ is offline
Poohbah
HD7970GHZ's Avatar
HD7970GHZ Primum Non Nocere
 
Member Since: Sep 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,476

5 yr Member
2,015 hugs
given
PC PoohBah!
Default Re: Does meds actually help?

Hi Autumn4689,

I see you are fairly new at PsychCentral. I want to say welcome.

As far as your plight goes... To answer your question in short: effectiveness of medications depends entirely on the individual taking them. (What works for one, may not work for another). I took them for years and they never helped the core trauma issues; those issues persist even today.

How can medications stop your suspicions when those suspicions are completely logical and CAN happen? Perhaps the medications can damper the intense emotions that result from those suspicions, which could prevent a large scale argument from occurring - but odds are your suspicions would remain regardless if you were taking medications or not.

Bare in mind that your assumptions / suspicions can be found in every relationship, whether you have BPD or not. It is extremely easy to invalidate ourselves and pathologize, rather than accept our own fallibility as being a part of the human condition. I don't know a single human being who hasn't felt (at some time) like someone lied to them. On one hand, it can be seen as a detriment to the relationship if the thoughts are untrue, but on the other hand it could be seen as VITALLY important information if it is true. Either way, there is nothing wrong with having feelings or thoughts and there is absolutely nothing wrong with approaching your Significant Other and asking for clarification when you feel uneasy and require reassurance.

The important thing is that we do not assume. Until we know the facts, we have to fight so hard not to react, otherwise we risk sabotaging a relationship and winding up alone.

Your triggers led you to believe that your Significant Other was lying to you. Before you jump to the conclusion and label yourself as delusional, be careful not to invalidate yourself. Whether or not your SO is lying to you is extremely important, but the fact that you thought this was happening is not necessarily delusion; perhaps it happened to you before in the relationship? Perhaps it happened in a different relationship? I don't know a single human being who hasn't been lied to. Those of us with trauma are VERY sensitive to our environments, especially in our interpersonal relationships. We don't want to be harmed, so our sensitivity is amp'd up and we look for signs of danger / threat. This is called hyper-vigilance and it is a byproduct of trauma. Some argue that hyper-vigilance is unhealthy - but it is not. It is a VERY important aspect of being human and will serve as a radar for protecting yourself against danger. In saying this, it makes perfect sense that you would be concerned about your Significant Other lying to you, especially if you have been lied to in the past. If this resonates with you, the goal for you would be to learn to discern what is happening in the present, from what has happened in the past. Sometimes we believe something is happening in the present (that happened in the past), because we become triggered and it FEELS the same. But feelings are not facts - they are just feelings.

My question for you is - what led you to believe that your Significant Other was lying to you? Perhaps in sharing your process of thinking - we can help you further. If you are unaware of what triggers you had - that is the first key to growth. You must become aware of your triggers so that you can learn how they impact you, how to prevent them from happening and how to react when they do.

When I was in DBT, medications were (generally) frowned upon because (according to DBT professionals) BPD is NOT a chemical imbalance, but rather, a result of trauma. This is being acknowledged more and more in the therapy world. Of course, this doesn't mean that those with BPD cannot also have a chemical imbalance, in which case medications might actually help. More and more, BPD is seen as a trauma induced disorder. The argument goes, that if you treat the core traumas - a lot of the symptoms found in BPD will deminish and or improve. That is the hope anyway.

I hope you have a good day,

Thanks,
HD7970ghz
__________________
"stand for those who are forgotten - sacrifice for those who forget"
"roller coasters not only go up and down - they also go in circles"
"the point of therapy - is to get out of therapy"
"don't put all your eggs - in one basket"
"promote pleasure - prevent pain"
"with change - comes loss"
HD7970GHZ is offline   Reply With QuoteReply With Quote
Old 05-15-2019, 04:52 PM #3
autumn4689's Avatar
autumn4689 autumn4689 is offline
Junior Member
 
Member Since: May 2019
Location: NC
Posts: 12
autumn4689 autumn4689 is offline
Junior Member
autumn4689's Avatar
autumn4689 has no updates.
 
Member Since: May 2019
Location: NC
Posts: 12

11 hugs
given
Smile Re: Does meds actually help?

Thank you soooo much for your feedback and insight! It all made so much sense to me. Iíve been stuck in this funk for so long and scared to reach out. Iíve never put it in that perspective before. Iíve never thought about triggers. Youíre exactly right though. It is from a past relationship. I got the same feelings i did before and assumed. He is very patient with me and knows my past. He lets me have access to his phone, does everything he can to reassure me he has nothing to hide. But in The back of my mind I start thinking, what if heís just really good at hiding things. In over a year weíve lived together and not once have I caught him in a lie or doing anything harmful to jeopardize our relationship. As far as the trauma Iíve experienced, I couldnít nail one thing down that could have led me to be diagnosed with BPD. But thank you again for your response. Itís truly given me a lot to think about and focus on! I hope you have a great too!
Autumn 🍂
autumn4689 is offline   Reply With QuoteReply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:32 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® — Copyright © 2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.



 

advertisement

Psych Central Forums

Psych Central is the leading mental health website, overseen by mental health professionals since 1995.

 

Helplines and Lifelines

The material on this site is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider. .

Always consult your doctor or mental health professional before trying anything you read here.
Please read the full disclaimer.